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Full text of "Echo"

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1948 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/echo1948smit 



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Friday, June 18, 1948, at 8.00 P. M. 



PROGRAM 

1. Processional 

2. The National Anthem 

3. Address 

WILLIAM R. BARRY 

Superintendent of Schools, Northampton, Mass. 

4. Music — "Morning Invitation" Veazie 

SCHOOL CHORUS 
Accompanist— DOROTHEA FORTSCH 

5. Announcement of Awards 

PRINCIPAL JOHN C. JAKOBEK 

6. Presentation of Diplomas 

WILLIAM H. DICKINSON 
President of Smith Academy Board of Trustees 

7. School Song 

8. Recessional 



GRADUATES OF 1948 

THADDEUS S. BESKO CARL M. MAJESKEY 

EVELYN V. CACKOWSKI JEANETTE H. NIEWINSKI 

*ESTHER M. CARTER CARL F. NARTOWICZ 

FRANCIS E. DUGAL ETHEL P. OMASTA 

JOHN J. FOSTER LAURA A. PELC 

RICHARD A. JANDZINSKI *DOROTHY A. SKARZYNSKI 

RICHARD J. KARPINSKI BERNARD S. WENDOLOWSKI 

♦EVELYN M. KACINSKI FRANCES L. ZUCHOWSKI 
FRANK E. KOCHAN 
*Pro Merito 



AWARDS 



Pro Merito Pins — Dorothy Skarzynski, Evelyn Kacinski, Esther Carter 
American Agriculturist Foundation presents five dollars to the boy who 
has done outstanding work in Agriculture — Bernard Wendolowski 

Sons of the American Revolution Medal for excellence in United States 
History — Esther Carter 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Award for the best work in mathematics 
and science — Carl Majeskey 

Reader's Digest Award of one year's subscription to the Reader's Digest 
to the class valedictorian — Dorothy Skarzynski 

Becker College Scholarship Key to the student completing the Commercial 
Course with the highest average — Francis Dugal 

Hatfield Book Club presents five dollars to the student that has made the 
most progress in Home Economics — Theresa Nartowicz 

American Agriculturist Foundation presents five dollars to the outstanding 
girl in Home Economics — Evelyn Cackowski 

Woman's Endeavor Society Award for the student that has contributed the 
most to Smith Academy by her manners and speech — Evelyn Kacinski 

Class of 1927 Shield is presented to the girl that has contributed the most 
to Smith Academy by her earnest work, exemplary conduct, and in- 
terest in student activities — Esther Carter 

M. Larkin Proulx Shield to the boy who has contributed the most to Smith 
Academy by his manly bearing, earnest work, reliability, and interest 
in student activities — Richard Jandzinski. 

St. Casimir's Society Honorarium for outstanding scholarship: 

Dorothy Skarzynski — $35 for attaing the highest scholastic average 
Esther Carter — $10 for attaining the second highest average 
Evelyn Kacinski — $10 for attaining the second highest average 



CLASS MOTTO 
"Ending But Beginning" 

CLASS COLORS CLASS FLOWER 

Blue and White White Rose 

SMITH ACADEMY BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

William H. Dickinson, President 

Robert C. Byrne, Vice-President 

George H. Howard, Secretary and Treasurer 

Arthur C. Bardwell 

William R. Cutter 

G. Raymond Billings 

Luther A. Belden 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

John P. McLeod, Chairman 

Robert C. Byrne, Secretary 

Stanley Ziezulewicz 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
Gilbert D. Bristol 

FACULTY OF SMITH ACADEMY 

John C. Jakobek, Principal 

Wallace Hibbard 

Marian Holmes, R.N. 

Florence E. Muller 

Bridget C. O'Neill 

Margaret E. Pruzynski 

Mary E. Ryan 

Mary A. Spakowski 

John Symancyk 

SUPERVISOR OF MUSIC 
Maude E. Boyle 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Issued by the Students of Smith Academy 
Hatfield, Massachusetts 



Vol. VIII 



June, 1948 



CONTENTS 

In Memoriam 2 

Dedication » 3 

Faculty 4 

Year Book Staff 6 

Senior Class Officers 7 

Senior Pictures „ 8-12 

Class Day 13-14 

Washington Trip 16-17 

Senior Play 1 8 

Junior Class 20 

Prize Speaking 21 

Sophomore Class 22 

Freshman Class 23 

Student Council 24 

School Paper Staff 25 

Pro Merito 2 6 

Sports 27 

Physical Education 28 

Boys' Basketball _ 29 

Girls' Basketball 30 

Class Snaps 32-33 

Alumni 34-35 

Advertisements 37 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 




(3ln JHsmartam 



On December 10, 1947, the flag at Smith Academy flew at half mast 
for George S. Belden, who died suddenly the day before. Mr. Belden, inter- 
ested always in the affairs of the town and the schools, presented to Smith 
Academy in 1917 the George S. Belden Shield, which is inscribed every year 
with the name of "the boy who has done the most for Smith Academy by 
his earnest work, manly bearing, and interest in athletics." The fine ideals 
stressed in this Belden Shield have served as a guide for worthy conduct 
among S. A. boys for the past thirty years. Mr. Belden was born on April 8, 
1872, in Bradstreet, and was a graduate of Smith Academy. He was very 
much interested in the study of livestock and agriculture, and his life as a 
farmer can be taken as a model by boys in this agricultural community. He 
became successful as a breeder and exhibitor of sheep and won many prizes 
at the Chicago International Livestock Show. He also won national honor 
when he was elected president of the American Southdown Association. He 
was trustee of Smith Academy from 1915 to 1940 and won in the hearts of 
the students who came to know him a lasting affection. He will always be 
remembered in Smith Academy and in Hatfield as a man who was a great 
American and a true friend. 



SMITH ACADEMY 




Jleittcattmt 



We respectfully dedicate this yearbook to Gilbert D. Bristol, our super- 
intendent of schools. We want him to know that we are cognizant of the 
inspiring leadership that he has provided, not only for the high school, but 
for the elementary schools as well. The continuous improvement of the local 
schools in recent years is evidence of his untiring efforts and able admini- 
stration. His efforts to incorporate the best and most advanced social and 
educational philosophies into the school program have placed the Hatfield 
schools in the ranks of the most advanced in this vicinity. Because of his 
knowledge, cooperativeness, and sincerity he has been able to inspire and 
lead both the teachers and pupils in carrying out sound policies and achieving 
worthwhile objectives. We dedicate this yearbook to him with the hope that 
we can, in this small way, express our appreciation for his excellent and un- 
tiring work in our behalf. 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 




Mr. Jakobek, principal of Smith Academy for two 
years, 1946 - 1948, has gained the lasting admiration 
and appreciation of all the students in the school. He 
has helped and is helping many with the guidance pro- 
gram that he is trying to institute into the school sys- 
tem. The class of '48 says, "Thanks, Jay, for every- 
thing," and all the other classes echo this sentiment. 



Mr. Hibbard, our "Aggie" teacher, is one of those 
few (at least in Smith Academy) shy quiet people. The 
swell field trips that he and his boys take are envied by 
everyone else in the school. Also, it is Mr. Hibbard and 
his "Aggie" boys who are lucky enough to get invited 
to those wonderful H. A. parties. Mr. Hibbard has to 
come all the way from Hadley; and although it never 
ceases to amaze onlookers, he always gets here. 





Mrs. Muller, who this year taught French, Latin, 
World History, and Algebra I, is also coach of the girls' 
basketball team. As you can see, she is very versatile. 
Mrs. Muller is also the class adviser for the class of '49. 
We are glad to leave our place as seniors to such a group 
as the one she advises. 



Mrs. O'Neill has been our class adviser during both 
our junior and senior years and has helped us along 
tremendously. It has been she who has guided the com- 
mercial students of the senior class through the "ins" 
and "outs" of that complicated subject — bookkeeping. 
She and Mrs. Spakowski accompany Mrs. Muller to Hat- 
field every day — rain or shine. 




SMITH ACADEMY 




Mrs. Pruzynski, of the commercial department, has 
been an indispensable helper to the editors of both our 
school paper and our yearbook. She and her typing 
students have done a marvelous job, and Smith Academy 
students certainly appreciate her advice and assistance. 
Mrs. Pruzynski is also the adviser for the sophomore 
class. 



Miss Ryan, our home room teacher, has been a great 
help and inspiration to us all throughout our high school 
years. Besides teaching us not to say "ain't got no," 
she has helped the juniors and prize speakers with their 
declamations each year. She coached those in the senior 
play, and it was largely through her efforts that we were 
so successful. Miss Ryan has been active in helping us 
publish the school paper and the yearbook and is adviser 
for the freshman class. 





Mrs. Spakowski, a newcomer to Smith Academy, 
has indeed been an addition to the faculty. She was of 
invaluable assistance to us in arranging the stage for 
"A Date With Judy." Mrs. Spakowski is in charge of the 
Home Arts course. She even has a class of boys who are 
trying to beat the girls at cooking. (Are they succeeding 
girls?) She helps the H. A. girls put on those wonderful 
parties which make the rest of us want to take the H. A. 
course. 



Mr. Symancyk, besides teaching two regular classes 
every day, and coaching boys' sports, is also the physical 
"ed" instructor in both the high school and the grammar 
school. That position, we are sure, has meant a great 
deal of work for him, because this is the first year that 
we have had such a program in Hatfield. Mr. Symancyk 
has also done a wonderful job in his various other assign- 
ments. 




PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Yearbook Staff 




Seated — Jeanette Niewinski, Ethel Omasta, Francis Dugal. 

Standing — Richard Jandzinski, Barbara Ryan, Walter Moskowicz, Evelyn Kacinski, Roger Wendo- 

loski, Bernard Saydlowski, Esther Carter, Patricia Mullins, Dorothy Skarzynski, Kay O'Neal, 

Carole Howard, Virginia Yarrows, Dorothea Fortsch. 
Not in Picture — Robert Breor. 



At the fall meeting of the Western Massachusetts 
League of School Publications held at the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts, one of the highlights of the 
program was the round table discussion of year- 
books. The discussion favoring a school year- 
book instead of a senior yearbook was led by Miss 
Una Hilliker of Technical High School, Spring- 
field, and Mr. John E. Snow of the Valley Litho 
Company, Holyoke. Those who attended gathered 
many pointers which they passed on to the rest of 



the yearbook staff. Both the speakers emphasized 
the fact that the yearbook should represent the 
school instead of presenting the seniors to the 
public. In an atempt to compile a book of this type, 
we have put greater emphasis on pictures, including 
some of the classroom scenes. It is our hope that 
by publishing a pictorial school yearbook, we shall 
be able to give our readers some idea of just what 
our school is doing in the classrooms as well as in 
extra-curricular activities. 



SMITH ACADEMY 



Senior Class Officers 




Esther Carter, Richard Jandzinski, Carl Majeskey. Francis Dugal. 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 




THADDEUS BESKO "Sam" 

We will always remember Teddy Besko from Bradstreet for his famous 
grin. Teddy, who took the general course, was a member of the glee club 
for four years, and was also active in the chorus for four years. Teddy is 
a sports enthusiast and was on the baseball team during his freshman year, 
on the soccer team during his sophomore year, and on the basketball team 
during his junior and senior years. Teddy was manager of the soccer 
team during his last two years in school. We are sure he will be a good 
farmer because he was chosen president of the S. A. Chapter of Future 
Farmers of America during his senior year. Teddy is seen quite ofter at 
the dances at White Eagle. Could it be a blonde there or just to dance? 



EVELYN CACKOWSKI "Evie" 

Evelyn Cackowski, a bright-eyed girl who comes from Bradstreet, 
took the commercial course for four years. She also took Household Arts 
her second and third year. Evelyn belonged to the chorus and girls' glee 
club for four years. She was outstanding in her sewing and cooking and 
was one of the girls chosen for the interior decoration job in the girls' 
room. She'll never forget Redman's or White Eagle, and that certain lad 
from Sunderland. 





ESTHER CARTER "Es" 

Esther, one of our out-of-town students who entered Smith Academy 
in her junior year, is one of our honor students. We find Esther, editor-in- 
chief of our year book, outstanding in all her studies, as well as extra- 
curricular activities. In her senior year she became a Thespian and took 
part in the senior play, "A Date With Judy" as Hannah the cook. She be- 
came a prominent member of the Pro Merito in her junior year and pre- 
sident in her senior year. In her senior year she was also our class secretary, 
as well as assistant editor of the school paper and editor-in-chief of the 
yearbook. She was also one of the chief typists on the school papsr staff 
in her junior year. We all can agree that Esther's outstanding ability will 
carry her through to success! 



FRANCIS DUGAL "Dugie" 

This young boy is one of our Hatfield students who has taken the 
commercial course during his four years in Smith Academy. In his third 
year he became feature editor of the school paper and presented us with 
some very worth-while features. He has also been one of our typists on the 
school paper and yearbook staffs in his junior and senior years. In his 
senior year he became our class treasurer. We all know Francis loves to 
study. Especially bookeeping! He is also known as the class "quiz kid." 
Francis' favorite pastime is bothering the girls; for wherever you see the 
girls, you see Fran. 




SMITH ACADEMY 




JOHN FOSTER "Johnny" 

This handsome fellow was born in Michigan in 1929. He came to 
Hatfield in 1943 During his years in S. A. he has shown a keen interest 
in sports and has participated in other activities as well. While a freshman, 
he was class president. In his junior year he was the second prize winner 
of the Annual Prize Speaking Contest. He also held the position of class 
vice-president during this year. He has been outstanding in soccer and 
basketball all during his high school years, as well as baseball during his 
freshman and sophomore years. He became captain of the basketball team 
during his junior year and has held that position throughout his senior 
year. As captain he really showed his ability and did his best to keep the 
team going. In his fourth year he took part in the play "A Date With 
Judy." We all agree that Johnny is a very popular boy in Smith Academy. 
Most of his leisure time is spent with a certain girl from Bradstreet ! 



RICHARD JANDZINSKI "Dick" 

This active lad was born and educated in Hatfield and in his senior 
year at S. A., he rose to be president of our class. During his four years 
in high school, Dick was a member of both the chorus and the boys' glee 
club. He took part in prize speaking in his junior year and did very well. 
Dick was also a member of our yearbook staff in his senior year. Aside 
from this, he showed interest in athletics and played both soccer and base- 
ball in his sophomore year. He rates high with a girl named Ruthie, whom 
he met on our class trip; and if you ever want to hear stories about our 
trip, Dick should be able to tell you many. 





EVELYN KACINSKI "Evie" 

Evelyn Kacinski, one of our brilliant honor students in the classical 
course, comes from Bradstreet. She belonged to the chorus and girls' glee 
club for four years. She was on the school paper staff as a reporter her 
first and second years; associate editor her third year and co-editor her 
fourth year. On the yearbook staff she had the part of associate editor her 
third year, and business manager her fourth year. She was a Pro Merito 
student during her third and fourth years, and first prize winner in the 
Prize Speaking Contest her third year. Evelyn is rather quiet and shy. 
but has a very nice smile. 



RICHARD KARPINSKI "Karpy" 

Richard Karpinski, one of our Hatfield students in the general course 
knows all of the short-cuts in geometry. He belonged to the chorus and boys' 
glee club for four years. In his senior year he was a very efficient stage 
manager for our class play. Richard is noted for his scientific interest 
and for his queer comical laughs in school. We are sure that he will never 
forget his trip to Washington nor that certain girl called Florence from 
Hadley. 




10 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 




FRANK KOCHAN "Wimpy" 

This good-looking senior comes from Hatfield, as do most of our 
good-looking boys! While in S. A., Frank has become a well-liked fellow. 
He has been outstanding in extra-curricular activities — especially sports. 
In his freshman and sophomore years he excelled in baseball, soccer, and 
basketball. During his senior year he played basketball and soccer. As one 
of our top scorers on the basketball team, he won much popularity with 
all students. He was also a prominent member of the Student Council in 
his junior year. Frank has a great heart interest in South Deerfield. Can 
we guess why, Frank ? It seems Wimpy has a hard time trying to keep 
awake in school. Could that certain girl in South Deerfield have some- 
thing to do with it.-' 



CARL MAJESKEY "Jake" 

Carl Majeskey, one of our outstanding classical students, is also the 
only senior boy who belongs to the National Guard. Carl is president of 
Student Council and vice-president of our class. He belonged to the chorus 
and boys' glee club for four years and was an outstanding soccer player 
for three years. He likes music — he plays with the Five Aces — and guns. 
His hobbies are target practice, banjo playing and going to Holyoke — but 
not for dancing. Aren't we right, Carl ? 





CARL NARTOWICZ "Chocolate" 

Carl Nartowicz, one of our students from North Hatfield, was a 
commercial student for three years and an agricultural student in his fourth. 
Carl was outstanding in the Vo-Ag department and was an able represen- 
tative in contests in judging fruit, vegetables, and stock at fairs and at 
University of Massachusetts. He represented S. A. in the annual F. F. A. 
speaking contest held in West Springfield this year. He was in the chorus 
and boys' glee club for four years. Carl didn't like to give "orals" in 
English class, but did like to flirt with the girls in the back row. 



JEANETTE NIEWINSKI "Jet" 

Another popular Bradstreet girl is Jeanette Niewinski. In her sopho- 
more and junior years she was our capable class secretary. Because of her 
speed she was a typist for the school paper and also a high-scoring forward 
on the basketball team in her junior year. She was picked for the Annual 
Prize Speaking Contest in her junior year and won second prize. In the 
senior play she made a hit when she played the role of Barbara, a typical 
teen-ager. Her efficient capabilities made her the vice-president of the 
Student Council and also a typist for the school paper and yearbook. As 
a cheerleader she vigorously cheered our team and especially Johnny, her 
heart's desire. On the class trip in April, Jeanette, we think, had a mar- 
velous time especially on our free nights! 




SMITH ACADEMY 



11 




ETHEL OSMASTA "Phil" 

This girl comes from North Hatfield and is a popular student at 
Smith Academy. While in S. A. she has taken part in many activities which 
has helped her achieve this popularity. She became the class treasurer in her 
junior year. As a typist on the school paper and yearbook she did very 
well. In her junior year she became one of our speedy forwards on the 
girls' basketball team. She was a very peppy cheerleader in her junior and 
senior years. Ethel is very fond of sports, especially basketball. She has 
a weakness for dancing — especially square dancing. This is one girl who 
understands what fun is ! Just ask her about the Washington trip and those 
phone calls from all those handsome fellows she met! 



LAURA PELC "Gus" 

Laura comes from Hatfield and is also one of the quiet girls in Smith 
Academy. She has taken the commercial course throughout her four years. 
She became one of our best cheerleaders in her junior and senior years. 
Most of her attractiveness is her beautiful hair. It really catches one's eye. 
Laura will never forget the wonderful time she spent in Washington and 
the late hours she spent with the girls in Room 211. Nor will she ever 
forget those sailors who tried to date her at Glen Echo Park in Washington. 





DOROTHY SKARZYNSKI "Tweetie" 

Dorothy Skarzynski, who is our first honor student, also comes from 
Hatfield. Louring her four years in high school, she took the classical 
course. In this time she was very active in extra-curricular work. In her 
freshman year she was elected vice- president of our class. During her 
sophomore year she was elected president of our class and treasurer of the 
Student Council and also class reporter for the school paper. While a 
junior, she became a member of the Pro Merito and again did much out- 
standing work on the school paper and yearbook. "Dotty" was also one 
of the girls chosen to speak in the Annual Prize Speaking Contest. Because 
of her studious ambitions in her senior year she continued as a member 
of the Pro Merito, and became co-editor on the school paper, a business 
manager on our yearbook staff, and the D. A. R. student. When April 
came, she also went on the Washington trip. If you want her to smile, 
just mention Henry and she will show you what attracted her to his eyes. 



BERNARD WENDOLOWSKI "Corner" 

Bernard Wendolowski, who comes from Hatfield, has, like all of us, 
been interested in both the glee club and chorus during his four years 
in S. A. Bernie is also very interested in sports and was on the soccer and 
basketball teams during his sophomore, junior, and senior years. A mem- 
ber of the vocational course, Bernie was a speaker for the Future Farmers 
of America in West Springfield when he was a junior. In his senior year, 
he was elected vice-president of the Smith Academy Chapter of the F. F. A. 
Bernie is seen a great deal in Bradstreet. Could it be Charlotte who attracts 
him there ? 




12 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 




FRANCES ZUCHOWSKI 



"Prim" 



Frances Zuchowski, a brown-eyed girl, comes from Hatfield. She 
was a commercial student and belonged to the chorus and girls' glee club 
for four years. Her third year was a big year — she took part in the 
Annual Prize Speaking Contest and she also had the horior of being 
named Queen of the Prom. Prim will never forget a certain "Bob" from 
Vermont whom she met on her trip to Washington, nor will she forget 
the "goodbye." Will you, "Prim"? 



Ex-Seniors 



ANN CMELESKI 
ROBERT CUTTER 
CLEMENTINE GALENSKI 
CHARLES LABBEE 
RICHARD LABBEE 
ROBERT LABBEE 
DOROTHY LIBERACKI 
FRANK MASLOSKI 
JANET MATUSIEWICZ 



LUCY NOVAK 
CARL PELC 
JOSEPH PORADA 
ARTHUR PROULX 
CAROL RAFFA 
EDWARD SZEWCZYK 
HELEN SZEWCZYK 
JOHN TOCZKO 



SMITH ACADEMY 



13 



CLASS DAY 



Class History 



Friends and Classmates: 

We shall never forget our years here at Smith 
Academy. Our first day in high school, initiation, 
prize speaking, sports, D. R's, exams, and the 
Washington trip. Memories of/ these events always 
bring a smile to our faces, and to our lips the 
words, "I wish that I were back in S. A. !" 

As a group, twenty-five strong, we entered S. A. 
in 1944. We weren't an unusual class; we didn't 
know where we were going the first few days; but 
with the assistance of our upper classmates we 
managed to find our places in Smith Academy. Mr. 
Bart and Mrs. Muller were appointed our faculty 
advisors. We elected class officers: president, Doro- 
thy Skarzynski; vice-president, Richard Labbee; 
secretary, Carl Raff a; treasurer, John Toczko. Carl 
Majesky was our first representative to the Student 
Council. Students who made the first honor roll 
were Dorothy Skarzynski, Evelyn Kacinski, and 
Helen Szewczyk. On the second honor roll were 
Jeanette Niewinski, Carl Majeskey, and Francis 
Dugal. 

In 1945, twenty-three of us returned to complete 
our sophomor year. Dorothy Skarzynski was elect- 
ed president again; Laura Pelc, vice-president; 
Jeanette Niewinski, secretary; and Dorothy Lib- 
eracki, treasurer. Mr. Larkin and Miss Connelly as- 
sisted us through our sophomore year. Dorothy 
Skarzynski was chosen our representative to the 
Student Council. 

The Halloween party which we gave on October 
26 was a great success and our only social venture 
as a class. 

Our junior year proved to be our busiest year. 
We now had only twenty-one students. Again offi- 



cers were elected: Charles Labbee, president; John 
Foster, vice-president; Ethel Omasta, treasurer; and 
Jeanette Niewinski, secretary. Ted Besko and Frank 
Kochan were our Student Council representatives. 
We also added a new member to our class, Esther 
Carter, who came to us from Chicopee, Massachu- 
setts, and Round Pond, Maine. Mrs. O'Neill was 
our class advisor. Our first activity was the fresh- 
man reception. This, we enjoyed very much; be- 
cause the freshmen were cooperative, everyone had 
a wonderful time. 

When nineteen of us came back in September, 
1947, as seniors, we embarked upon the happiest 
of the four years. Our elected officers were: presi- 
dent, Richard Jandzinski; vice-president, Carl Ma- 
jeskey; secretary, Esther Carter; and treasurer, Hel- 
en Szewczyk, who was later succeeded by Francis 
Dugal. Mrs. O'Neill acted as our class advisor. 
Carl Majeskey, Dorothy Skarzynski, and Jeanette 
Niewinski were elected to the Student Council; 
and John Foster, Ted Besko, Bernard Wendolow- 
ski, and Frank Kochan participated in various 
sports throughout the year. Besides sponsoring a 
successful square dance as a means of raising 
money, some of us participated in presenting the 
senior class play. Helen Szewczyk, Esther Carter, 
John Foster, and Jeanette Niewinski represented 
the class in the cast of "A Date With Judy,'' while 
Richard Karpinski and Carl Majeskey were able 
stage crew members. 

The happiest event of the entire year, besides 
graduation, was our trip to Washington and New 
York. Those of us who went all had a wonderful 
time and wish we could be seniors for another 
year. But, June is here and it is time for us to say 
"au revoir" to dear old Smith Academy. 



14 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Address to Undergraduates 



. . It is a pleasure and a great honor to address you, 
undergraduates, in behalf of my class. Your studies 
thus far must have taught you that the road of life 
is hard and difficult, and only the ones who are 
willing to put their utmost into their work can ever 
hope for success. That word success is a difficult 
word to define. One definition which you may find 
practical states: "Success consists in making the 
most of one's opportunity." We know from obser- 
vation and reading that the person who makes the 
most of each passing minute will achieve success 
more quickly than the one who kills time at home, 
in school, or on the job. 

As all of you realize, your remaining days at 
Smith Academy are limited. Some of you people 
have one year; others, two; and freshmen, three. 



Let me say this to all of you, freshmen, sopho- 
mores, and juniors: You will not always have your 
parents and teachers to look after you, to help you 
carry your burden, or to assist in solving your 
problems. You must remember that your high 
school days are days of preparation and growth. 
Unless you decide early not to depend on someone 
else, you will delay and reduce the rewards of edu- 
cation that are yours. Therefore, make the most of 
every opportunity to develop self-reliance and ac- 
quire knowledge. Do your best in the time that is 
left to you, so that you will be prepared for the 
future. The Class of 1948 wishes you success in 
this undertaking. 

Richard Jandzinski 



Presentation of Class Gift 



Four years ago we entered Smith Academy. Now 
our high school life is finished, and we are leaving 
school, conscious of the fact that we live in a time 
when education is more vitally needed than ever 
before. But as we go, we all find abundant cause 
to remember our school with gratitude, for in Smith 
Academy we have received a good education. As a 
symbol of our gratitude, and also because we would 
like to be remembered as a part of Smith Academy, 
we present this sum of money for the Athletic 
Fund, with the hope that it will not only serve as 
a memory of the Class of 1948, but will also be a 
help to the students of Smith Academy who par- 
ticipate in sports in the years to come. 



Richard Jandzinski 



SMITH ACADEMY 



15 




16 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Washington Trip 




SMITH ACADEMY 



17 



Washington Trip 



On Monday, April 19, twelve S. A. seniors 
boarded a train in Northampton at 7:23 A. M. 
The annual Washington trip had finally started on 
this fine morning. S. A. students, six girls and six 
boys, including Evelyn Kacinski, Jeanette Niewin- 
ski, Ethel Omasta, Laura Pelc, Dorothy Skarzynski, 
Frances Zuchowski, Teddy Besko, Francis Dugal, 
John Foster, Richard Jandzinski, Richard Karpinski, 
and Frank Kochan, soon became acquainted with 
people from Hopkins and Deerfield, who went 
along on the "H. F. Battey tour." Travel time went 
by quickly and merrily, and soon we found our- 
selves on a ferry heading for Jersey City Terminal. 
From the ferry we had a beautiful view of the 
Statue of Liberty on Bedloe's Island. We arrived at 
Union Station, Washington, D. C. shortly after six 
and a motor coach took us to the Burlington Hotel 
where we were given our room numbers and keys. 
After the long trip, we decided to write cards and 
retire early. (Some did, most didn't.) 

Tuesday morning, after breakfast had been 
served at the hotel, we met our official guide, Mr. 
Smith, and about eight-thirty we were off in our 
chartered motor coach "5120" for the Bureau of 
Engraving and Printing, where the whole group 
enjoyed a tour of the building where all the pa- 
per money and securities of the government are 
printed. This building is known as the largest en- 
graving plant in the world. A guide conducted the 
group through the especially constructed galleries 
and explained various operations in printing 
money. Next we made a visit to the Pan-American 
Union building. The chief feature of interest here 
is the typical Spanish patio at the entrance. The 
Washington monument was our next stop. Here 
the surrounding country may be seen from the top, 
500 feet above the ground. Just before lunch we 
visited the White House; and after lunch at the 
hotel we went in our coach on a tour through the 
city, where Mr. Smith pointed out many embassies, 
foreign homes, and important public buildings. We 
stopped at the Arlington National Cemetery, where 
the tomb of the Unknown Soldier was the most im- 
pressive sight. We continued through historic Alex- 
andria, Virginia, and visited Mount Vernon. Re- 
turning to the hotel, we made a stop at Lincoln 
Memorial and after dinner visited Congressional 
Library. 

Wednesday the first locomotive, the first tele- 
phone, all the inaugural gowns of presidents' wives 
and many other historic items were seen at the 
Smithsonian and New National Museums. Before 
lunch a visit was also made to the Mellon National 
Gallery of Art, a beautiful building of rose-white 
marble costing $15,000,000. In the afternoon, a 
long trip by motor coach took us to the United 



States Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland. 
Naval cadets were everywhere, and points of in- 
terest included the tomb of John Paul Jones, sur- 
rounded by solid gold rope, Brancoft Hall, the gym- 
nasium, and Severn River. (Five S..A. students will 
never forget being lost here.) In the evening, most 
of the party went to Glen Echo Park. 

Thursday morning started with a visit to the 
famous Franciscan Monastery, where replicas of the 
tombs of the Holy Land were seen. We also toured 
Zoological gardens, containing the most complete 
collection of animals, birds, and reptiles in the 
world. After lunch we visited the U. S. Supreme 
Court and made a most interesting guided tour of 
the United States Capitol building. Both the House 
and the Senate were in session at the time, and we 
visited both galleries, where we could see and hear 
what was going on. Other interesting spots in the 
Capitol were pointed out, such as the old Supreme 
Court, the old Senate, the old House of Represen- 
tatives, and many other places of interest. In th; 
evening, most of the party went to Loew's Capitol 
theater to see Xavier Cugat in person. Others 
went shopping, since the evening was free of plans. 

After breakfast Friday we left the beautiful, his- 
toric city of Washington, D. C. and headed for 
New York. From Jersey City we again rode the 
ferry and arrived on Seventh Avenue at the beauti- 
ful Victoria Hotel shortly after lunch on the train. 
Our first visit in New York was to Radio City 
Music Hall, the largest theater in the world, where 
we saw an excellent stage show which included 
the famous "Rockettes." The party also saw a 
screen show here. Dinner was at the Down Under 
Restaurant at Rockefeller Center, and following 
dinner we enjoyd a guided tour of the National 
Broadcasting Studio. Here we saw the famous 
"Waltz Time" radio program rehearsing and all 
the various sound effects were pointed out. The 
party also made a visit to the Observation Roof at 
Rockefeller Center, which is 77 stories above the 
ground. Here we had a view by night of New York 
City with its Empire State Building and many 
other skyscrapers. We also enjoyed the beautiful 
night view of the Hudson River and East River 
from this point. 

Saturday morning we spent shopping in the great 
stores of New York. After lunch at the Down Un- 
der Restaurant, we took a motor coach tour of 
downtown New York. The Bowery, Chinatown, 
Wall Street, The Little Church Around the Corner, 
and many other places were pointed out. We then 
went to Grand Central Station and left New York 
at 5.25. Our trip came to an end when we arrived 
in Northampton shortly after nine. 

Evelyn Kacinski, '48 



18 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



'A Date With Judy" 




1st row — Edward Betsold, Helen Szewczyk, Roger Wendoloski, Kay O'Neal, Robert Breor, Elinor 

Vollinger, John Foster, Jeanette Niewinski. 
2nd row — Barbara Ryan, Carole Howard, Esther Carter, Phyllis Kochan, Patricia Mulling, Janet 

Vollinger, Bernard Saydlowski, Virginia Yarrows, Richard Karpinski, Carl Majeskey. 



On the night of November 14 the Thespians 
presented "A Date With Judy," a three-act comedy, 
for the benefit of the senior class. The play pro- 
vided an evening of laughter for the large crowd 
that filled the Memorial Town Hall and everyone 
commended the fine acting. 

In the title role of Judy Foster, Kay O'Neal was 
talented, charming, and versatile, and won the 
hearts of the audience as the adorable teen-ager. 



Robert Breor, played the part of Oogie Pringle, 
the "man" in Judy's life, and his dogged determina- 
tion provided the audience with many laughs. The 
Foster parents were successfully portrayed by Hel- 
en Szewczyk and Roger Wendoloski. Roger played 
the alert business man with force and discrimina- 
tion and provided some of the comedy, while Helen, 
as the progressive matron with a strong family 
[Continued on page 36] 




SMITH ACADEMY 



19 




20 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Junior Class 




1st row — Mrs. Muller, Alvin Rejniak, Walter Moskowicz, Kay O'Neal, Edward Betsold, Mildred 

Toczko, Lucy Zawacki, Roger Wendoloski. 
2nd row — Patricia Mullins, Alice Cybulski, Nancy Holley, Irene Maciorowski, Carole Howard, 

Virginia Yarrows, Barbara Ryan, Teresa Nartowicz. 
Not in Picture — Robert Breor. 



As strangers in new territory, we entered the 
freshman class in 1945 with 26 pupils. At our first 
class meeting the following officers were elected : 
president, Mildred Toczko; vice-president, Frances 
Woodward; secretary, Lucy Zawacki; and treasurer, 
Alice Paniczko. The class was ably guided by facul- 
ty advisers Mrs. Muller and Mr. Bart. At first, ad- 
justment to the new surroundings and procedures 
was difficult; but we gradually got into the "swing" 
of things. Our activities were limited to one dance, 
which was not exactly as successful as we hoped it 
would be. One of the events which does stand 
bright in our memory was the freshman reception 
given by the class of '47. We were given a "royal 
welcome" by the entire student body and we all 
had a wondrful time. We think of our freshman 
year as our most exciting in high school as yet. 

With the sophomore year came more complicat- 
ed problems and more activities. The juniors agree 
that their sophomore year was outstanding in diffi- 
cult subjects. Our class advisor for this year was 
Mrs. Muller, and class officers were: president, 
Roger Wendoloski; vice-president, Mildred Tocz- 
ko; secretary, Barbara Ryan; and treasurer, Edward 
Betsold. This year it was upon our shoulders to 
give the annual Halloween party — and how very 
pleased we were with the results of the fun-filled 
pvenine! Later in the year, when the seniors refused 
the opportunity to sponsor the spring prom, a group 
of active sophomores took it upon themselves to 



carry out the plans for the June social, which proved 
to be quite worth while. At the end of this term, 
weary of our difficult problems we were happy 
to see our sophomore year pass. 

Feeling more grown-up and superior, we entered 
the Junior class full of spirit. Most of the students 
went into their studies "hand and foot," with five 
or S'x subjects on their hands. Class Officers chos- 
en this term were: president, Katherine O'Neal; 
vice-president, Edward Betsold; secretary, Mildred 
Toczko; and treasurer, Lucy Zawacki. Mrs. Muller 
served as our class advisor. 

This term it was our duty to sponsor the fresh- 
man reception, which was a "smashing" success. 
Through dependable committees chosen to carry 
out the plans, the freshmen were given quite a 
"beating;" but they all seemed to be able to stand 
it and were swell sports. 

Our junior year proved to be one of fun and in- 
terest, but it was also one of the most disliked by 
many students because of the public speaking exhi- 
bition which requires that every member of the 
junior class give a competitive speech. 

As our third year of high school passes, we look 
back to the three years of fun and excitement; but 
we look ahead to the most envied year in S. A. — 
the senior year, with its exciting activities, the an- 
nual Washington trip, and the preparation for the 
most important day in high school, our anticipated 
graduation day. 



SMITH ACADEMY 21 



Prize Speaking 



First prize winners in this year's Annual Prize 
Speaking Contest were Kay O'Neal and Roger 
Wendoloski. Kay's speech, "Poor, Poor, Junior," 
was a serious narrative dwelling on the plight of a 
boy and a girl whose life dreams were shattered. 
Roger's selection, "Our Final Choice" told of the 
immediate need for a world government. Second 
prizes were awarded to Lucy Zawacki, who gave 
"The Waltz," a humorous selection which told of 
a girl's despair as she danced with a not-too-grace- 
ful partner; and to Walter Moskowicz, whose 
speech was "You're the Boss," warning us of the 
dangers of Fascism and Communism. Mr. Raymond 
Williamson, of Williamsburg High School, chair- 
man of the judging committee, announced the prize 
winners. Miss Helen Bokina, a graduate student at 
Smith College, and Miss Fanny Allen, of Hopkins 
Academy, were the other judges. 

The other speakers and their subjects were: Rob- 
ert Breor, "My Financial Career" — a humorous nar- 
rative about a timid soul depositing money in the 
bank; John Barrett, "Taking America for Granted" 
— a warning to all Americans not to "take America 
for granted;" Irene Maciorowski, "A Father's Sac- 
rifice" — telling of a father's devotion to his child 
in the Displaced Persons Camp of Europe; Patricia 
Mullins, "The Way Back" — an emotional speech 
about a man who conquered insanity; Edward Bet- 
sold, "No-Nerves Nelson" — depicting the life of a 
man with no nerves; and Barbara Ryan, "The Debt- 
Collector" — concerning a man and his foolproof 
crime. 

Music, under the direction of Miss Maude E. 
Boyle, included selections from "H. M. S. Pinafore" 
by Gilbert and Sullivan, sung by the chorus with 
Richard Jandzinski and Bernard Saydlowski as so- 
loists. A piano solo "Valse Arabesque," by Lack 
was played by Dorothea Fortsch. 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Sophomore Class 




1st row — Francis Holhut, Bernard Saydlowski, Dorothea Fortsch, Mary Belden, Carol Levitre, Ann 

Kennedy, Helen Backiel. 
2nd row — Joseph Szych, George Coor, Robert Widelo, Antoinette Neilson, Phyllis Pelis, Joan 

Moriarty, Mrs. Pruzynski. 
Not in Picture — Leonard Klekot, Janet Vollinger, John Barrett, Stanley Mason. 



At the beginning of our freshman year at Smith 
Academy the following officers were elected: presi- 
dent, Raymond Jenness; vice-president, B;rnard 
Saydlowski; secretary, Joseph Kirejczyk; treasurer, 
Robert Widelo. Our class advisor was Mr. Bart 
who resigned soon after the opening of the school 
year. Mrs. Pruzynski was then appointed our ad- 
visor. In February we put on a Valentine Party 
with refreshments and dancing. No other social ac- 
tivities were sponsored by our class that year. When 
we came back in the fall, the following officers 
were chosen: president, Bernard Saydlowski vice- 



president, Dorothea Fortsch; secretary, Janet Vol- 
linger; treasurer, Mary Belden. Mrs. Pruzynski was 
our class advisor. Carol Levitre, Helen Backiel, and 
Ann Kennedy were elected to our executive com- 
mittee. In November our class gave a Halloween 
Party. The opening feature was a "truth and con- 
sequence" program with Dorothea Fortsch as the 
master of ceremonies. Prizes were given to the win- 
ners, and also to the people with the funniest, most 
modern, and prettiest costumes. For the rest of the 
evening there was round and square dancing, and 
refreshments were served at ten-thirty. 



SMITH ACADEMY 



23 



Freshman Class 




1st row — Stanley Pitchko, Chester Foster, Elinor Vollinger, Patiicia Mason, Phyllis Kochan, 

Marilyn Pelc, Nancy Barsh. 
2nd row — Donald Jandzinski, Henry Kabat, David Omasta, Donald Breor, Eugene LaFrance, Julia 

Szych, Mildred Novak, Miss Ryan. 

Not in Picture — Francis Godin. 



When the 1947-48 school year started on Sep- 
tember 6, a group of sixteen freshmen entered S. A. 
At the first class meeting in October, they elected 
the following class officers: president, Phyllis Ko- 
chan; vice-president, Marilyn Pelc; secretary, Nancy 
Barsh; treasurer, Chester Foster; and executive com- 
mittee, Marilyn Pelc, Patricia Mason and Donald 
Jandzinski. Regular weekly class dues were also 
voted. 

The freshmen gave a spring dance on April 2, 
with music by the "Seven Aces." During intermis- 
sion refreshments were served. The hall was at- 
tractively decorated with streamers and balloons in 
the pastel shades by a committee composed of Mari- 
lyn Pelc, Nancy Barsh, Elinor Vollinger, and Hen- 
ry Kabat. Other committees were: refreshments, 
Mildred Novak, Patricia Mason, Julia Szych and 
Francis Godin; tickets, Chester Foster and Donald 



Breor. Clever posters for the event were made by 
Francis Godin. When the last dance ended at eleven- 
thirty, all agreed that they had had a good time. 
Thus, the first dance sponsored by the class of '51 
was a success. 

On April eighth, the class had a dinner party at 
Hotel Northampton. Before dinner they visited the 
Old Country Store which proved to be an interest- 
ing place with its old merchandise, odd posters and 
antique equipment. Then they dined in Wiggins 
Old Tavern. After a delicious meal they went to 
Forbes Library, where they were taken on a tour of 
the various departments and given an opportunity 
to examine the various collections exhibited on the 
second floor. 

Principal Jakobek, Mrs. O'Neill, Miss Ryan and 
Mrs. Spakowski, of the faculty, accompanied the 
group. 



24 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Student Council 




1st row — Mary Belden, Dorothy Skarzynski, Jeanette Niewinski, Edward Betsold. 
2nd row — Chester Foster, Roger Wendoloski, Carl Majeskey. 



At the first Student Council meeting, heW Sep- 
tember 26, Principal Jakobek presided and the fol- 
lowing officers were elected: president, Carl Ma- 
jeskey; vice-president, Jeanette Niewinski; and sec- 
retary-treasurer, Dorothy Skarzynski. Other mem- 
bers of the Council are Roger Wendoloski, Edward 
Betsold, Mary Belden, and Chester Foster. 

On September 30, Mr. Mowry, a representative 
of the Crowell-Collier Publishing Company, at- 
tended our meeting and outlined for us the meth- 
ods and benefits of a sales campaign. After some 
discussion, the Council voted to sponsor a magazine 
campaign in Smith Academy in order to raise need- 



ed money. At a general assembly, each student was 
presented subscription blanks, given instructions 
concerning sales and information about bonuses and 
prizes to be awarded the best salesman. The total 
amount earned for the school in this campaign was 
$76.58. With this fund, the Student Council was 
able to provide buses for the basketball games and 
to present, on February 6, the movie, "Charm and 
Personality." 

The Council also sponsored Junior Red Cross 
Day on December 15. Generous contributions were 
received from most of the students. 



SMITH ACADEMY 



25 



School Paper Staff 




1st row — Roger Wendoloski, Evelyn Kacinski, Dorothy Skarzynski, Jeannette Niewinski, Ethel 

Omasta, Virginia Yarrows, Teresa Nartowicz, Kay O'Neal. 
2nd row — Francis Dugal, Bernard Saydlowski, Esther Carter, Lucy Zawacki, Edward Betsold, 

Mildred Toszko, Patricia Mullins, Carole Howard, Barbara Ryan. 
Not in Picture — Robert Breor. 



After several meeting in Miss Ryan's room, the 
following school paper staff was chosen: Evelyn 
Kacinski and Dorothy Skarzynski, co-editors; 
Esther Carter, associate editor; Barbara Ryan and 
Virginia Yarrows, feature editors; Mildred Toczko, 
Lucy Zawacki, Carole Howard, and Robert Widelo, 
reporters; Kay O'Neal, literary editor; Pat Mullins, 
sports editor; Edward Betsold and Robert Breor, 
art editors; Ethel Omasta, Teresa Nartowicz, and 
Jeanette Niewinski typists; Roger Wendoloski and 



Bernard Saydlowski, business managers; and Miss 
Ryan and Mrs. Pruzynski, faculty advisers. 

In the fall, delegates attended the fall conven- 
tion of the Western Massachusetts League of School 
Publications held at the University of Massachusetts. 
At this meeting, prizes were awarded to the school 
papers having winning entries in the league com- 
petition held the previous spring. Round table dis- 
cussions were also scheduled and delegates at- 
tended several on newspaper production. 



26 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Pro-Merito 



On November 8, the Pro Merito members, Eve- 
lyn Kacinski, Dorothy Skarzynski, Esther Carter, 
Barbara Ryan and Lucy Zawacki, accompanied by 
faculty advisers Miss Ryan and Mr. Jakobek, en- 
joyed a day of fun at Easthampton where the Pro 
Merito Zone Meeting was held. 

Arriving at the Easthampton High School about 
9.45, the group registered, and was welcomed by 
Easthampton students who showed visitors through 
all the classrooms, the gym, and the laboratory, 
and explained what classes were held in each room 
and how they were conducted. 

At 11.00 a meeting was held for the advisors in 
one of the classrooms while a meeting for the dele- 
gates was held in the auditorium, with Bernard 
Lovely presiding. After he told of the plans for the 
day, a number of selections were played by the 
Easthampton High School Orchestra, with Eli 
Bourdon conducting. This was followed by a wel- 
come extended by Principal Howell K. Thayer. The 
program continued with the reading of the reports 
from each school represented and the recitation of 
the poem "If" by Barbara Konopka. The meeting 
closed with the singing of the Pro Merito song. 

At 12.00 a delicious luncheon, enjoyed by all, 
was served at Ionic Hall. After the luncheon Wil- 
liam A. Dexter, Superintendent of Schools, spoke 
briefly. This was followed by a very interesting talk 
given by Robert W. Hisey, a student at Williston 
Academy, who told of the strict schools and the 
wild, man-eating animals in South Africa, where 
he had spent his early childhood. Another speaker 
with a very interesting topic, Mrs. Harvey Benson, 
was introduced later in the afternoon. Mrs. Benson 
told how she, a teacher, had been interned in the 
Philippines during the war. She mentioned the 
great hardships they had to undergo in the camp. 
Despite this, the adults there wished their child- 
ren to get some sort of education; so, they gath- 
ered up scraps of wood, and built desks and Mrs. 
Benson told how she was happy to teach the eager- 
to-learn children. 

A football game was scheduled for afternoon en- 
tertainment, but because of the heavy rain it was 
voted that we should not attend the game. Instead, 
a social gathering was held, with singing and danc- 
ing. About 3.00 we returned to Hatfield, after hav- 
ing a wonderful day. 




Dorothy Skarzynski, Lucy Zawacki, Evelyn Kacinski, 
Esther Carter, Barbara Ryan. 



On May 8, accompanied by Mr. Jakobek, we 
went to Tech High in Springfield to attend the 
annual state convention. At the business session a 
new constitution was adopted and new officers 
were chosen. It was voted that the next Pro Merito 
zone meeting would be held at Northampton in the 
fall. After a lunch in the school cafeteria, delegates 
heard a very inspiring address by Professor Rand 
of the University of Massachusetts who took for 
his subject, "Apples of Hesperides." The afternoon 
closed with dancing in the gym. 



SMITH ACADEMY 



27 




28 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Physical Fducation 



The comprehensive physical education program 
placed in the course of study for this year has been 
planned to provide each individual uniform growth 
and development. There are three excellent reasons 
for a course such as the one adopted this year. It 
must be admitted that the recreational aspects of 
physical education are desirable in that the proper 
use of leisure time in the coming years depends 
upon participation in desirable activities today. For 
those with correctible physical defects such as round 
shoulders, the remedial aspects of this program 
should provide improvement. 

Though there are many reasons for physical edu- 
cation, the most important are biological and physi- 
ological. Participation in a program of physical 
activity develops organic power, strength, agility 
and poise. The normal heart and circulatory systems 
become stronger and more efficient in moving 



blood to the active regions when repeatedly re- 
quired to do so. The voluntary muscles also increase 
in size and grow stronger when gradually increas- 
ing loads are placed on them to the point where 
their maximal voluntary pulling power is involved. 
This program should develop the following ob- 
jectives: the maintenance, improvement and appre- 
ciation of good health; optimum growth and de- 
velopment of each individual according to what 
his capabilities warrant, mindful of the differences 
in individuals, and greater appreciation and intel- 
ligent use of physical education activities adapted 
to individual needs. With the additional shower and 
locker room facilities recently approved by the 
town, the physical education program of Hatfield 
should meet the needs of the youth of Hatfield. 

John C. Jakobek 



Soccer 



Smith Academy's 1948 soccer squad had a fair 
season, with six defeats, one tie, and two scoreless 
games. 

Ted Besko, a good man, was unable to play this 
year because of an accident that left him with a 
bad leg. Through graduation, the squad had lost 
such players as Stanley Kirejczyk, Alex Widelo, 
and John Fortsch. This left weak spots in the 
line-up; nevertheless, the boys fought hard and 
were not to be taken lightly. 

The schedule included one game with the East- 
hampton team, champions of Western Massachu- 
setts. This team was indeed out of our boys' class, 
and as a result the boys suffered defeat in a hard 
game. 

At the beginning of the season Coach Symancyk 
was able to depend on scrimmage sessions, be- 
cause of the number of boys who reported for 
practices. We must salute the under-classmen, who 



reported faithfully for practices and, when needed 
in a game, showed a developing talent. 

In winding up the year's schedule, Coach Sym- 
ancyk lost the following seniors: John Foster, 
Bernie Wendolowski, "Jake" Majeskey, "Wimpy" 
Kochan. Nevertheless, we are looking forward to 
next season, expecting some good games. 





SUMMARY 




Holyoke High 


5 


Smith Academy 





Holyoke Trade 


3 


Smith Academy 





Hopkins Academy 


2 


Smith Academy 


1 


Easthampton 


7 


Smith Academy 





Smith School 


1 


Smith Academy 





Holyoke High 


2 


Smith Academy 


1 


Holyoke Trade 


1 


Smith Academy 


1 


Hopkins Academy 





Smith Academy 





Smith School 





Smith Academy 






SMITH ACADEMY 



29 



Boys' Basketball 




1st row — Frank Kochan, John Foster, Teddy Besko. 

2nd row — Mr. Symancyk, Donald Jandzinski, Chester Foster, John Barrett, Roger Wendoloski. 

Not in Picture — Bernard Wendolowski. 



Although the S. A. boys finished in sixth place 
in the Hampshire League, they always fought to 
the last and lost a few contests by close margins. 
The four wins out of sixteen starts were over 
Smith School, Arms, and twice over a newcomer to 
the league circuit, St. Michael's. 

In their first league game the boys played an 
excellent brand of basketball, defeating Arms 
Academy by a 27 - 26 score. S. A. rallied to win 
in this exciting game, with the decision in doubt 
until the last second. The two most exciting games 
seen by the S. A. rooters proved to be surprises, 
when our boys outplayed St. Michael's in all de- 
partments. In those contests, the boys played 
their best games of the season, and their fast floor- 
work, passing and shooting, as well as pressure 
defense, virtually stopped St. Michael's from con- 
necting with a floor basket in some periods. In 
another thriller, the team lost to South Hadley, the 
runner-up of the Hampshire League, by faltering 
in the last five minutes, after leading by a five-point 
margin throughout the contest. 

Smith Academy's '47 basketball club was com- 
posed of "Corner" Wendolowski and "Wimpy" 
Kochan as forwards; Leonard Klekot, center; and 
John Foster and Ted Besko, guards. In reserve, 
S. A. had Chet Foster and Don Jandzinski. 

On February 28, the boys ended their season, and 
as a result, Coach Symancyk has lost practically 



his entire varsity squad, except for Leonard Klekot, 
a sophomore, who played good basketball, and 
will no doubt be a strong man for next season's 
team. 

The season's basketball record: 

INDEPENDENT GAMES 



West Springfield 


52 


Smith Academy 


20 


St. Mary's 


20 


Smith Academy 


16 


St. Mary's 


26 


Smith Academy 


12 


HAMPSHIRE LEAGUE CONTEST 




Arms. 


26 


Smith Academy 


27 


Orange 


28 


Smith Academy 


22 


Deerfield 


29 


Smith Academy 


24 


Smith School 


18 


Smith Academy 


27 


South Hadley 


55 


Smith Academy 


31 


Amherst 


55 


Smith Academy 


26 


Hopkins 


40 


Smith Academy 


24 


St. Michael's 


16 


Smith Academy 


33 


Arms 


42 


Smith Academy 


22 


Orange 


37 


Smith Academy 


33 


Deerfield 


48 


Smith Academy 


28 


South Hadley 


33 


Smith Academy 


23 


Smith School 


35 


Smith Academy 


32 


Amherst 


66 


Smith Academy 


39 


Hopkins 


23 


Smith Academy 


11 


St. Michael's 


27 


Smith Academy 


31 



30 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Girls' Basketball 




1st row — Marilyn Pelc, Teresa Nartowicz, Lucy Zawacki, Patricia Mullins, Virginia Yarrows, 

Mary Belden, Patricia Mason. 
2nd row — Barbara Ryan, Phyllis Kochan, Alice Cybulski, Nancy Barsh, Nancy Holley, Elinor 

Vollinger, Mrs. Muller. 
Not in Picture — Janet Vollinger. 



Because of lack of transportation, the girls' team 
was unable to carry out as full a schedule as they 
wanted to. In spite of this, however, the team had 
six games with teams from nearby towns. Although 
we did not end with our schedule sporting all vic- 
tories, we had fun, and that is what any sports- 
man stresses. 

When Mrs. Muller first made her call for can- 
didates, she was surprised at the overwhelming 
interest in starting a team. But, because of con- 
flicts on practice days, some girls were unable to 
sign up. On the other hand, because the senior 
girls were working, the freshmen and sophomores 
who came out helped to form a team and were 
swell sports. 

Our first two games with Hamp High proved to 
be setbacks, but the girls all played hard. The next 
two games were with a newcomer to the circuit, St. 
Michael's. The Smith girls played an excellent 
brand of basketball, and showed what they could 
do with a school of their size. The last two games 



were with an old rival, Hopkins Academy. On the 
home floor we turned them back by a large mar- 
gin, but we were defeated in a return game by a 
49-34 score. 

Thus, we ended a fair season, and we are look- 
ing forward to a better one next year, since we 
do not lose any of the team at graduation. Players 
were: Pat Mason, Marilyn Pelc, Teresa Nartowicz, 
Elinor Vollinger, Pat Mullins as forwards; Lucy 
Zawacki, Virginia Yarrows, Mary Belden, Nancy 
Barsh, Phyllis Kochan as guards. Subs were Alice 
Cybulski and Janet Vollinger. Managers of the 
team were Nancy Holley and Helen Szewczyk. 





SUMMARY 






Hamp High 


46 


S. A. 


24 


Hamp High 


60 


S. A. 


20 


St. Michael's 


17 


S. A. 


39 


St. Michael's 


14 


S. A. 


35 


Hopkins 


24 


S. A. 


46 


Hopkins 


49 


S. A. 


34 



SMITH ACADEMY 



31 



Smith Academy 




32 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 




SMITH ACADEMY 



33 




34 



PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 



Alumni 



CLASS OF 1943 

RICHARD D. BELDEN, North Hatfield, Mass., 
student at Stockbridge; married 

ANNA N. BURDA, Main St., Hatfield, Mass.; 
secretary. 

MRS. MARY (CYBULSKI) CIALEK, Bradstreet, 
South Deerfield, Mass.; 2 children. 

ALEX CIZEWSKI, Elm St., Hatfield, Mass.; 
student. 

PAUL DICKINSON, North Hatfield, Mass.; poul- 
try raiser; married; 2 children 

LUANA EBERLEIN, Elm St., Hatfield, Mass.; 
bookkeeper, Meyer and Mendelsohn Tobacco 
Co., Hatfield, Mass. 

HELEN KACINSKI, 3740 John R. Avenue, De- 
troit, Mich.; nurse; employed at Harper Hospital. 

HENRY KUGLER, Bridge St., Hatfield, Mass.; 
co-owner of Square Deal Motor Sales, Hatfield, 
and the new Studebaker garage, Northampton. 

MRS. PHYLLIS (ZEMBISKI) KUZONTKOSKI, 
Elm St., Hatfield, Mass.; employed by Meyer and 
Mendelsohn Tobacco Co., Hatfield, Mass. 

DOROTHY MAJESKEY, North St., Hatfield, 
Mass.; employed by Meyer and Mendelsohn To- 
bacco Co., Hatfield, Mass. 

MRS. IRENE (HARUBIN) NEWELL, Jackson 
St., Northampton, Mass.; 1 child. 

JULIA NIEWINSKI, 21 Denison St., Apart. Bl, 
Hartford, Conn.; private secretary; employed by 
the Service School at Pratt & Whitney Plant, 
Hartford, Conn. 

FRANK OSCIAK, Main St., Hatfield, Mass.; 
student. 

MRS. STACIA (SLOVIKOSKI) POTYRALA, 
Main St., Sunderland, Mass.; clerk; employed at 
the Montgomery Ward Catalog Office, North- 
ampton, Mass. 

EDWARD R. REMISZEWSKI, 1911 N. Second 
St., Harrisburg, Pa.; accountant; 2 children 
(twins). 

ROBERT L. SAWICKI, Box 507, Sta. VI Guam, 
Guam, M. I.; carpenter. 

FRANCIS SKOCZYLAS, Elm St., Hatfield, Mass. 



LEONARD TOCZKO, School St., Hatfield, Mass.; 
proprietor of the Bake Shoppe, Hatfield; married. 

MARIE JEANNE WICKLES, 400 South St., 
Northampton, Mass.; has a teaching position in 
the East Hartford Public Schools. 

CLASS OF 1938 

MARY K. ALLAIRE, Main St., Hatfield, Mass.; 
registered nurse; employed by Dr. Cavanagh, 
Northampton, Mass. 

MRS. STAFIA (OLSZEWSKI) AMES, North St., 
Hatfield, Mass.; 1 boy. 

ARTHUR BELDEN, Main St., Hatfield, Mass.; 
working on Town roads. 

MRS. VERONICA (JACKOWSKI) JACKOW- 
SKI, 3 Chestnut St., Hatfield, Mass. 

MRS. JULIA (ZEHELSKI) MICHALOSKI, 8 
King St., Hatfield, Mass.;l boy. 

MRS. MARY (MULLANY) HALL, 15 Summit 

St., Springfield, Mass. 

JOHN MULLINS, 5 3 Linden St., Holyoke, Mass.; 
assistant manager of the Northampton Loan and 
Finance Company; married. 

MARY MULLINS, 4 Chestnut St., Hatfield, Mass.; 
registered nurse; employed in doctor's office in 
Hartford, Conn. 

WILLIAM OSCIAK, No. Main St., Hatfield, 
Mass.; farmer. 

MRS. DOROTHY (MULLINS) PACKARD, 
Goshen, Mass.; 2 children. 

MRS. NELLIE (WASKIEWICZ) PEASE, Pros- 
pect St., Hatfield, Mass.; 1 child. 

ANDREW PELIS, Mt. Tom, Mass.; employed by 
Meyer and Mendelsohn; married; 1 child. 

SYLVESTER PELIS, Prospect St., Hatfield, Mass.; 
employed by Meyer and Mendelsohn; married. 

PAULINE PETCEN, 17 Chestnut St., Hatfield, 
Mass.; ward secretary; employed at V. A. Hos- 
pital; Northampton, Mass. 

EMMA ROGALEWSKI, Prospect St., Hatfield, 
Mass.; employed at Meyer and Mendelsohn. 

MRS. CLARA (MARKOWSKI) SIEMIONKO, 

Bradstreet, So. Deerfield, Mass.; 1 child. 



SMITH ACADEMY 



35 



MRS. JENIE (LESUKOSKI) STOTA, 62 Elm 
St., Hatfield, Mass.; inspector; Prophylactic 
Brush Co.; Northampton, Mass. 

MRS. MILDRED (VACHULA) WRISLEY, 

Southampton, Mass.; 2 children. 

MRS. GERTRUDE (SIEMIONKO) ZAGROD- 
NIK, State Hospital, Northampton, Mass.; oc- 
cupational therapist. 

CLASS OF 1933 

MAJOR ROBERT A. BIEBER, HQ's Tohoku, M. 
G. Region, A. P. O. 309, P. M., San Francisco, 
California. 

MRS. MARY (JASKOWSKI) DOKTOR, Pros- 
pect. St., Hatfield, Mass.; 1 child. 

NELLIE DONNIS, Dickinson Hospital, North- 
ampton, Mass.; nurse. 

MRS, MARGARET (MULLINS) PFERSICH, 
Sunderland Road, Montague, Mass.; 2 children. 

MRS. ISABELLE A. (BOROWSKI) PIHL, 211 
Morrison Avenue, Somerville 44, Mass. 

E. SAMUEL PROULX, Main St., Hatfield, Mass.; 
farmer; chairman of Honor Roll Committee; 
former selectman of Hatfield. 

HELEN ROGALEWSKI, deceased. 

MRS. LAURA (PELIS) SLOWIK, Chestnut St., 
Hatfield, Mass. 

MARY SMITH, Bridge St., Hatfield, Mass.; em- 
ployed by Dearing Jewelers. 

MRS. JENNIE (TOBACCO) BALDWIN, 107 
Jefferson Ave., Hartford, Conn.; 2 children. 

GENA WASKIEWICZ, Chestnut St., Hatfield, 
Mass.; employed by Meyer and Mendelsohn. 

CLASS OF 1928 

LILLIAN BETSOLD, State Road, West Hatfield, 
Mass.; at home. 

WILLIAM C. CELATKA, 7 Plymouth Place, Hol- 
yoke, Mass.; clerk-salesman; married; 1 child. 



HENRY A. CHARLEBOIS, 12 Morin St., Pittfield, 
Mass.; supervisor of accounts; married; 5 
children. 

JOEL DWIGHT, deceased. 

ROBERT FITZGERALD, Veterans Hospital, West 
Roxbury, Mass.; maintenance man; married; 1 
boy. 

PAUL OSLEY, 34 Van Horn, W. Springfield, 
Mass.; married. 

MRS. MARGARET (WHALEN) WILLIAMS, 
King St., Hatfield, Mass.; 4 children. 

MRS. KATHERINE (SHEEHAN) BURKE, 19 
Edwards St., Springfield. Mass. 

CLASS OF 1923 

MRS. MARY (GRAVES) ANDERSON, 15 Fair- 
view Terrace, Greenfield, Mass.; 3 children. 

SANFORD O. BELDEN, 21 Rankin Ave., East 
Longmeadow, Mass.; office manager; Equipment 
Sales, Inc.; Springfield, Mass. 

CLARENCE EUGENE BELDEN Chicago, 111. 

THEODORE WALLACE BELDEN, 23 Stockman 

St., Springfield, Mass. 

SIDNEY G. CARL, 35 School St., Hatfield, Mass. 
grower and packer of leaf tobacco; married; 3 
children 

MRS. KATHLEEN (CONNELLY) DILLON, 20 
Woodlawn St., Randolph, Mass.; married Frank 
Dillon, former teacher at Smith Academy; 4 
children 

ROBERT FIELD, No. Hatfield, Mass.; farmer. 

MRS. ANNA HUNT (BELDEN) KEELER, 
Johnson, Vermont; 4 children. 

HELEN RYAN, 12 E. 24 St., New York City 
10, N. Y.; registered professional nurse; present 
position, assistant superintendent of nurses — 
Bellevue School of Nursing, N. Y. C; assistant 
professor of nursing education, New York 
University. 



36 PURPLE AND WHITE ECHO 

Senior Play 



(Continued from page 18) 

feeling, played her part with charm and sincerity. 

Edwaid Betsold, in the role of Randolph, Judy's 
younger brother, played his part with nonchalance, 
wit, and versatility, and provoked many of the 
laughs of the evening. Esther Carter, as Hannah, 
the cook, also provided some comedy and com- 
bined gruff belligerence with loyal devotion to give 
a realistic portrayal. 

Jeanette Niewinski, as Judy's friend, Barbara 
Winsocket, played the typical teen-ager, and 
Janet Vollinger, who played Judy's other pal, Mitzi 
Hoffman, provided some of the evening's comedy 
with her antics with bubble-gum and her theatrical 
performance as Madame Dubuque. Bernard Sayd- 
lowski in his portrayal of Mr. Martindale, the 
nervous Broadway producer, combined dignity, an- 
noyance and despairing resignation in a clever per- 
formance. Virginia Yarrows, as Mrs. Schlutzham- 
mer, showed a fine talent with her clever char- 
acterization of the P. T. A. member who turned 
from gushing praise to wrathful condemnation. 
Patsy Mullins also gave a realistic performance as 
the ambitious mother of Eloise, played by Phyllis 
Kochan, whose "elocuting" added to the comedy 
of the play. Johnny Foster gave a creditable per- 
formance as Rex O'Connor, the new boy in the 
neighborhood; and Elinor Vollinger, as his little 
sister Suzie, gave a very spirited portrayal. Carl 
Majeskey's rendition of the radio announcer was 
professional. In between acts, the Smith Academy 
girls' chorus, under the supervision of Miss Maude 
E. Boyle, introduced several novelty tunes which the 
audience accepted enthusiastically. 

The stage manager was Robert Breor, assisted 
by Bernard Saydlowski, John Foster and Roger 
Wendoloski; and our capable technicians were Carl 
Majeskey and Richard Karpinski. The properties 
were taken care of by Helen Szewczk, Esther Car- 
ter, Patsy Mullins, Virginia Yarrows, Phyllis Ko- 
chan and Elinor Vollinger, with Mrs. Mary Spa- 
kowski as faculty advisor. The prompters were 
Carole Howard and Barbara Ryan. The play was 
coached by Miss Mary E. Ryan, head of the English 
department, who was presented a gift and a cor- 
sage by members of the cast in appreciation of her 
efforts. 



TOCZKO'S BAKERY 




49 School Street 


TOCZKO'S CAFE 


Try Some Good Pastries, 


48 School Street 


Bread, Cakes, Pies 


New Management 


We Cater to All Parties 

Tel. 2781 


Stop In Ladies Invited 


TOCZKO'S PACKAGE 




STORE 


TOCZKO'S SWEET SHOP 


School St. Hatfield 


49 School St.. Hatfield 


Tel. 2031 


Tel. 2781 


WE DELIVER 


• 


Compliments of 




DEARING'S JEWELERS 


Compliments of 


Northampton — Easthampton 
Timepiece Specialists 


FRANK'S BARBER SHOP 


For Correct Time 


Prospect St. Hatfield 


Call Northampton 3511 






Eat and Enjoy 


HATFIELD MARKET 


MANHAN'S 


MEAT - PROVISIONS 


Potato Chips Cheese Corn 




and 


Tel. 3911 M. Klocko, Prop. 


Norma Lee Candies 




Manhan Potato Chip Co., Inc. 



Compliments of 

THE IMPERIAL AGRICULTURAL CORP. 

of Massachusetts 


James P. Flynn Pharmacy 

24 Main Street 
Northampton 


Compliments of 
E. S.DICKINSON 


THE BEE HIVE STORE 

SHOES and FURNISHINGS 
29 Main St. Northampton 


Compliments of 
GEORGE H. HOWARD 

Life Insurance — Annuities 

66 Main St. Tel. 4462 
HATFIELD 


Compliments of 

LABBEE'S 

SERVICE STATION 

John Labbee, Prop. 

State Road West Hatfield 


ZENAN J. BARSH 

Mason - Contractor 

Dwight St. Hatfield 
Tel. 4111 



L. G. BALFOUR COMPANY 

Attleboro Massachusetts 

Class Rings and Pins 

Commencement Invitations 

Diplomas — Personal Cards 
Club Insignia 

Memorial Plaques 

Represented by: GRON P. LLOYD 
P. 0. Box 144 Canaan, Conn. 


1896 — 1948 

NORTHAMPTON COMMERCIAL COLLEGE 

"The School of Thoroughness" 

For more than a century we have prepared young people for success- 
ful careers. We pledge a continuance of our thorough training, 
individual interest, and aid in finding just the right position. 


WEBSTER BOX 
COMPANY 


BOB'S SODA 
SHOPPE 


Compliments of 

B. & B. RESTAURANT 

Manager, Paul Stefancik 

Prospect St. Hatfield 


A Real Good Place to Eat 
BECKM ANN'S 

Northampton 



Compliments of 


HATFIELD CLUB 


Compliments of 






Compliments of 


THE FAIR STORE 


DAILY HAMPSHIRE 


27 Pleasant Street 


GAZETTE 




Northampton 


Northampton 






DRESS WELL AND SUCCEED 


Compliments of 


Stylish Wearing- Apparel for the 




Man or Young- Man from 




Head to Foot 


UNITED DAIRY, INC. 


THRIFTLY PRICED 


NORTHAMPTON 


HARRY DANIEL ASSOCIATES 




Northampton 


Compliments of 


E. & J. CIGAR CO., INC. 


DR. 0. T. DEWHURST 






WHOLESALE 


Optometrist 


TOBACCONISTS 


Tel. 184-W 201 Main St. 




Northampton 


15 Conz St. Northampton 



DONNIS LUMBER CO. 



Hatfield 



McC ALL UM'S 



Northampton's Largest 
Department Store 



150-154 MAIN ST. 



PHONE 1310 



IMPERIAL BAKERY 


J. W. PARSONS & SON 




Farm Machinery and Tractors 


Szyosek Bros. 






Farm Supplies 


BREAD and PASTRY 






Phone 2885 P. 0. Box 152 


Pleasant St. Northampton 


75 North King Street 


Phone Northampton 308 


ATHLETIC SUPPLIES 


MARTIN A. PADDOCK 


T. A. PURSEGLOVE CO. 


FINE TAILORING 






15 State St. 


4 Crafts Ave.— Next to City Hall 




Northampton 


Northampton 



Compliments of 



PORTER-McLEOD MACHINE TOOL CO., INC. 



HATFIELD, MASS. 



Compliments of 



MEYER AND MENDELSOHN, INC. 



Compliments of 
STANLEY KACINSKI 

Bradstreet Cafe 
BEER — WINES — LIQUORS 


Compliments of 

HATFIELD GARAGE 


RUBY'S FURNITURE STORES 

Telephone 3519 
15 Bridge St. Northampton 


CARLSON'S 

Men's and Boys' Wear 

"Where the Boys and Men 
Like to Shop" 

Corner of Main and Pleasant 
Northampton 


Compliments of 

RAYMOND A. LABBEE 

"THE PINES" 

Modern Cabins Fountain Service 

Socony Service Station 

Tel. Northampton 292 


A. E. CELATKA 

Produce 

HATFIELD 


Compliments of 

MODERNE BEAUTY SALON 

42 Pleasant St. 
NORTHAMPTON 



Compliments of 



SQUARE DEAL MOTOR SALES 



Compliments of 



A FRIEND 





Compliments of 


MacDONALD'S 






NORTHAMPTON 


SHOE SHOP 


FROZEN FOOD 




LOCKER CO. 


185 Main St. Northampton 






LOCKER RENTALS 


Compliments of 


MERRITT CLARK & CO. 


WALTER KUCHYT, 


Sport Clothes 


Manager 


Priced right for the young- 


FIRST NATIONAL STORES 


man who graduates 


55 Main St. Hatfield 


NORTHAMPTON 



Compliments of 


Congratulations and Lots 




of Luck 


COHEN BROS. 


To The Class of '48 


Northampton 


JACK AUGUST 


and 


Northampton 


Easthampton 


"Eat Fish and Keep Fit" 


PIERCE'S PAINT STORE 


Compliments of 


196 Main St. Northampton 






E. J. GARE & SON 


PAINT, WALLPAPER 




AND GLASS 


Jewelers 


ARTISTS' MATERIALS 


112 Main St. Northampton 


Compliments of 


Bulova Elgin Hamilton 


WILLIAM DWYER 


Movado Longine 
Wittnaeur Watches 


FLORIST 


WOOD AND STRAND 


192 Main St. Northampton 


Jewelers 


TEL. 3714 


Northampton 




Phone 2590-W 


HARLOW & FENNESSEY 


EDWARD H. ZUJEWSKI 


SCHOOL SUPPLIES 


Electrical Contractor 


OFFICE SUPPLIES 


30 Main Street 




Northampton Massachusetts 


STATIONERY 





LOCKSMITH 




KEYS OF ALL KINDS 


HELEN'S BEAUTY SALON 


LUGGAGE REPAIRING 


245 Main St. Northampton 


HARLOW'S 


TEL. 733-M 


18 Center St. Northampton 


• 


We extend to the Class of 1948 of Smith Academy 


OUR CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES 


FOR A SUCCESSFUL FUTURE 


* * * * 


HOWARD & WOODWARD 


INSURANCE 


14 ELM STREET HATFIELD, MASS. 


Compliments of 


CONSOLIDATED CIGAR CORPORATION 


Compliments of 


Harubin's Service Station 


C E RRUTI' S 


Sunoco Dynafuel 


JEWELERS 


General Repairing 


Repairing & Engraving 




Northampton 


Phone 3080 North Hatfield 



ZIGMUNT JAWORSKI 

Watch Repairing — Dealer in Fine Jewelry 

45 School St. Tel. 3905 Hatfield 


Compliments of 

FINE'S ARMY-NAVY STORE 

37 Main Street Northampton 


Compliments of 

GRIFE'S DEPT. STORE 

Complete Line of 
Households and Domestics 

Northampton 


Compliments of 
PLEASANT PHARMACY 


Compliments of 

WOLFRAM'S GARAGE 

No. Hatfield Tel. 4381 


FREDERICK ADAMS 

"The Red Brick School House" 

Whately, Mass. 

ANTIQUES - FURNITURE 
CABINETMAKER 


JOSEPH SAYDLOWSKI & SON 

PRODUCE 
Hatfield Tel. 2351 



Compliments of 
H E R R I C K STUDIO 

100 Main St. Northampton 



BEAUTY CULTURE * * * 

In Its Most Advanced Form 

We prepare young men and women for a life of refinement . . . interest- 
ing work . . . security and prosperity. COURSES are complete and 
systemized. Our INSTRUCTORS have been carefully prepared to a re- 
quired standard, and each one is a GRADUATE of the ACADEMY itself. 
CLASSROOMS are spacious and modernly equipped ... an entire build- 
ing is devoted for this purpose. The number of high-class positions filled 
by our FREE PLACEMENT BUREAU has increased yearly for more 
than a decade. 

Moderate Tuition . . . Convenient Payment Terms 

DAY AND EVENING CLASSES 

Further information regarding the possibilities in this vocation gladly furnished 
Write for free booklet — or visit our Academy without obligation 

WILFRED ACADEMY of Hair and Beauty Culture 

492 BOYLSTON ST. BOSTON, MASS. KEnmore 6-0880 



PLEASANT TIME SHOP 

JEWELERS 

DIAMONDS - WATCHES - RINGS 

EXPERT WATCH REPAIRING 

All Work Guaranteed 

Tel. 1440 83 Pleasant Street 
Northampton, Mass. 


WEBB'S, INC. 

32 Main Street Northampton 
HOUSEWARES — CURTAINS — GIFTS 


PEP ACCORDION ACADEMY 

158 Main St. 71 Federal St. 
Greenfield Northampton 

Tel. 8784 Tel. 3048-J 


HAROLD J. MORSE 

Agrico Fertilizer 

64 Main St. 
TEL. HATFIELD 3221 


C. F. ROBERTS 

Native Poultry and Eggs 

Tel. 2591 Chestnut St. 

J 


Compliments of 
CARL'S WAREHOUSE 

Sidney G. Carl 



SWIFT'S 
Package Store 

ALES — WINES — LIQUORS 

COURTEOUS SERVICE 
Whately, Mass. 


MICHAEL S. RAFFA 

Dealer in 

POULTRY AND DAIRY PRODUCTS 

FERTILIZER — ROOFING — CEMENT 

Tel. Hatfield 3042 


Compliments of 

NORTHAMPTON 
SPORTING GOODS CO. 


Compliments of 

PETE'S MARKET 

Peter Lizak, Prop. 

Raymond Ave. Hatfield 


WALT'S CABINET SHOP 

Prospect Street 

Specialize in All Cabinet Work 
and Repair Work 

WALTER J. SZEPELAK, Prop. 


STOP AT 

THE MIDWAY 

For Tasty Hot Dogs 

348 y 2 King St. Northampton 



TOW. SW. 



KAZIMIERZ A 



Gr. 1965 Hatfield, Mass. 



CONN. RIVER STOCK FARM 



Home of Mighty H 



BEST OF LUCK 
TO THE CLASS OF '48 

NORTH HATFIELD CLUB 



WALTER DULASKI, Manager 



Compliments of 



HIGHWAY CLUB 



|*UttJ;lMMi£l£fc 


Compliments of 
CHARLES EBERLEIN 


Tel. 1307 28 Center St. 




Northampton, Mass. 


Plumbing 


Electrical Construction 




Radio Appliances 


HATFIELD, MASS. 


1900 1948 






Compliments of 




TONY'S SERVICE STATION 


HATFIELD SHOE REPAIR 


Carburetor and Ignition Service 


EDWARD JAWORSKI, Prop. 


Tires — Batteries — Accessories 




Corner of Main and Maple Street 




Tel. Hatfield 4761 



GOOD MUSIC 

for 
SHOWERS — DANCES — PARTIES 
Call CLYDE GALLANT Hatfield 4711 


MORIARTY BROTHERS 
FURNITURE 

NORTHAMPTON 


HOWARD JOHNSON'S 

WEST HATFIELD 
Tel. 4861 


Haskell Office Supply, Inc. 

"Everything for the Office" 

190 Main St. Northampton 

TEL. 672-W 


VANASSE & CO., INC. 

15 Strong Ave. 

Northampton, Mass. 
Package Store Tel. 2825 


Compliments of 

CZELUSNIAK 
FUNERAL HOME 


LA UNDERE TTE 

(Self -Service Laundry) 
Wet Wash 30c 

Dry Cleaning 

21 MASONIC STREET 

Northampton 



SEE IT MADE 
WIGGINS CANDY KITCHEN 

35 King Street 

"The Sweetest Place in Town" 


College Girls' Used Clothing 

Sold At 

COLLEGE SHOP 

190 Main St. Northampton 
Open Wednesday, Friday, Saturday 


R A H A R "S 

A Congenial Spot 
You'll Like A Lot 

Reservations Taken For 

Small and Large Parties 

7 Old South Street 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Tel. 550 


VENETIAN BLINDS 
AWNINGS 

Furniture Upholstery 

Window Shades 

Automobile Tops 

Glass and Body Work 

CHILSON'S SHOPS 

Tel. 1822 
34 Center St. Northampton 


Compliments of 

AHEARN FUNERAL HOME 


LA FLEUR BROS. 

The Paint People 

45 King Street Northampton 
Tel. 374-M 


Compliments of 

VICTORY MOTORS 

Pontiac - Cadillac 
Sales - Service 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS.